Tools Label

Keep NumLock on permanently

One of the remnants of early PC computers is the Num Lock key. For most people, like me, it is just a nuisance. I mostly use my laptop with a dock connected to a standard 102 key keyboard, so when I use the numpad, I want numbers to appear – I don't want the cursor to move semi-randomly across my document. When I sometimes hit the Num Lock key by accident, I'm always in for a few seconds of feeling annoyed.

I'm not the only one thinking this. A quick search for keep num lock key on permanently windows 10 gives hundreds of results, but most answers focus on making it turn on at reboot. I could only find one good answer to the actual question.

If you have the same problem, try importing this file in Regedit (run as administrator):

; numlock.reg
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_USERS\.DEFAULT\Control Panel\Keyboard]
"InitialKeyboardIndicators"="2147483650"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Keyboard Layout]
"Scancode Map"=hex:00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,02,00,00,00,00,00,45,00,00,00,00,00

This will fix two things:

  • The first setting makes Num Lock turned on by default at reboot
  • The second setting disables the Num Lock key (key code 45) completely so that its signals don't reach the operating system correctly

Disclaimer

Use this tip on your own risk. Don't forget to backup your registry before doing this. Changing things in RegEdit is always risky and in no event will I be liable for any loss or damage arising from the use of this information.

Posted by Anders Tornblad on Category Tools Labels
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Trying out Visual Studio Code

Yesterday Microsoft held Build 2015 and presented lots of nice things to the developer community. I have always loved Microsoft's developer tools, and started using Visual Studio back in 1997, hacking away with Visual Basic and Visual C++.

Now I still use Visual Studio at work, but for my personal projects, I mostly do web development in PHP and sometimes ASP.NET MVC. For the PHP projects, I have been using Komodo Edit for a while now, and am happy with it.

Visual Studio Code

Installing VS Code

After a quick download and a smooth installation, Visual Studio Code booted. I opened a folder full of PHP and JavaScript files. Syntax highlighting, bracket matching, syntax errors and warnings work really well for PHP, JavaScript, HTML and CSS, but PHP IntelliSense isn't included in this preview version, which unfortunately means I won't be switching. Yet. However, JavaScript IntelliSense is amazing! It found a rookie mistake for me...

Don't do bitwise operations on bool

IntelliSense in Visual Studio Code is really good in every language it supports. Code completion and suggestions for JavaScript, HTML, CSS, SASS and C# are instant, but some features are missing from HTML IntelliSense.

A couple of HTML IntelliSense suggestions

  • Allowed attribute values should be suggested, like when typing <link rel=", I would like a popdown list to suggest things like stylesheet and so on.
  • Element suggestion should only include elements that make sense in the context. Directly inside an <ul> element, there is no point in suggesting a <blockquote>. Only <li>, <script> and <template> elements make any sense.

Bad elements in UL

What will make me switch

The editor is really nice to work with, it feels snappy and does things well. Changing personal settings is done in JSON, which is cool, because JSON... Until PHP IntelliSense is added, and some improvements are made in HTML editing, I will stick to Komodo Edit, but I will probably switch to Visual Studio Code eventually.

Posted by Anders Tornblad on Category Tools Labels
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